Tag Archives: perceptions

10 Unexpected Lessons Learned from the Movie, “The Internship”!

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I get pretty weary of stupid-funny movies, but I was pleasantly surprised by The Internship, starring Vince Vaughn and the ever-so-charming Owen Wilson. I know I’m a little late to the party, but the movie is still worth the post. I thought it was funny, and not necessarily stupid, despite the on and off ratings that I’ve seen. After taking a course that involved quite a lot of film and media analysis, I’ve come to realize that it’s just a fact that I will dig for meaning in practically anything I watch (unless it’s a horror film, which in almost all cases, ends up making absolutely no sense and comes to no actual resolution for the main characters other than unapologetic mass demolition). However, there was no demolition to be had in this film and I found myself laughing a lot more than I had expected.

What have I learned, you ask?

Here are the 10 unexpected lessons I’ve learned from watching the movie, The Internship:

  1. People are so openly judgmental in this film. Yeah, they’re adult men in an internship. So what? If I were on their team, I wouldn’t take a second glance. There are plenty of men and women that are ages 30+ sitting in the same courses as me in college. Why is that any bit different? Regardless though, I’d like to think that how Billy and Nick, the main two guys, coped with the preliminary assumptions tacked upon them by their team was an exhibition of their characters’ determined attitudes. Even after realizing the mockery they were being dealt by their younger counterparts as full-grown men in a college internship program, they managed to gain respect by continuing to earn their place and suppressing the urge to be a poor sport.
  2. Positivity brings success, even if it’s not immediate. When their team bombs the Quidditch match by little to nothing, they still manage to cultivate positive energy through reinforcement. Instead of dwelling in the despair of loss and the looming fear of being ousted from the employment opportunity they had been working so strenuously for, they opt to take on a better perspective in hopes of annihilating their next quest.
  3. I don’t quite understand why The Internship established “stereotypes” almost immediately when the group was doing their introductions or the fact that the only woman in the group seemed to be somewhat insecure and dependent (not my cup of tea, but by the closing of the film, this fact became increasingly insignificant), but from the middle to the very end of the film, not only did those stereotypes fade into the background (hallelujah!), but the group managed to combine each individual’s skills to ultimately earn their victory. In a weird way, this goes to show that our world is full of talented, intelligent individuals, and a skill that I may be strong in might not be a strength for the next person. Therefore as horrible as it may be to work among teams sometimes, it’s beneficial to the outcome of the project. We all bring something different (and hopefully better!) to the table.
  4. Taking a break from work in times of high stress can help spark inspiration. It may even seem counterproductive, but this method actually works when it comes to meeting deadlines. I’m not saying throw back a tequila shot (or many) or get trashed at a club with a bunch of underagers like they did in the film on the night that your assignment is due, but try to give your brain a break. I personally do my best work when I stop inducing panic attacks and redirect my energy elsewhere temporarily. Distraction isn’t always such a bad thing!
  5. In preparation for the following day, one of their most essential challenges during the internship, Billy is left with the painful fact that there are absolutely no shortcuts to studying. Studying requires work, and work requires effort. Sorry, folks. No shortcuts for studying have been found thus far. Hit the books and they’ll hit back…..I guess?
  6. People can surprise you if you avoid judging them by their cover. The cover ISN’T ALWAYS RIGHT. Dana, played by Rose Byrne (known prominently for her role in Bridesmaids and Neighbors, as well as many other films) shoots Nick (Owen Wilson’s character) down over and over out of the assumptions that he wouldn’t be right for her (he’s an easygoing intern, she’s a structured, business-oriented, established employee). They go on one date and she realizes that he’s exactly the kinda of guy she’s looking for, the mac to her cheese. If she hadn’t given him that one chance, just because she had already made an assumption about the kind of person he is, it would’ve been back to square one. People are complicated. It’s going to take a lot more than a glance and some flirty smalltalk to figure someone out.
  7. If every workplace was like Google headquarters in this film (yes, I am aware that this film was also partially shot at a university and that some details are, in fact, fabricated for audience appeal), I feel like employees would have less concerns other than the work that they must put forth. The food is free, they provide transportation, they have nap pods available to the employees (can we make this a thing at universities please?!). You practically would have everything given to you on a silver platter so you could focus on what’s important: quality work.
  8. No angry man, not even Billy throwing a hissy fit, looks serious driving away on a red, yellow, and green Google bicycle. No one.
  9. Pizza makes everything better. They definitely won, not because of their apparent superiority among the other teams, but because of the impromptu pizza party that they happened to throw at the calculation of the teams’ results. They could’ve had my vote, I’ll tell you that. I wonder what phenomenal grade I could receive from buying out a Papa Johns to bring pizza during finals week…What’s higher than an A?
  10. A movie with Owen Wilson doesn’t have to be stupid. It can have some substance, which The Internship successfully proved! I think that Owen Wilson is an incredibly talented actor, but I don’t think the silly movies he’s found himself in do his acting talent any justice. This movie surprised and impressed me. Surprise, surprise. I may even watch it again.

I hope you liked the lessons I’ve learned!

If you can think of any as well, feel free to leave a comment below 🙂

Mandirito-signature-picture

“Feelings are for the Weak” (Who Are, Ironically, Much Stronger)

Ever since I was younger, it had been engrained in my head that those who are expressive of their feelings are weaker than the rest of the population that does not. It was always a battle for who could put on the best mask and pretend like they had their whole lives together, much better than the next person. I had surrounded myself with people that I considered friends at the time, but people that had no intention of building strength in the bond. It was a negative time for me, being surrounded by this kind of mentality. The first time I had really broken down my barriers I had built was my first serious relationship, which lasted for around 4.5 years, and even then, there were times when I wanted to keep them out of conversation and out of mind. I did, however, realize something when that relationship ended. All the times that I kept my feelings to myself were the times when I was causing my own destruction. I wasn’t punishing anyone else but myself by letting my pain eat at what I thought to be an otherwise strong exterior. I did learn something, over these years. Losing a serious relationship, eliminating the friendships that were destructive to my own path, becoming increasingly independent as I realized what was permanent and what was temporary…. I learned that I am much stronger than I thought I was, and that others who show the same kinds of strength are those who are not afraid to be real. I screwed up thinking that I was weak because I was honest about my feelings. I should’ve been upfront from the start, but I let my apprehension to do so get the best of me.

Part of this journey to redefine my understanding is shown through my writing. Writing gives me the ability to be honest without direct confrontation, and is something that can be shared or reflected upon individually. I’m continuing to grow and develop my skills of communicating what I need and desire from my life and my relationships with others, and I think this was a crucial part of my journey: establishing up front that being true to yourself gives you the best chance at happiness. I’m well on my way.

As for you, find the people you trust. There are many people out for themselves these days, but if you can find a handful that love and respect you as they do for themselves, you’ll become closer to connecting your feelings with strength. Those who do not patronize you for your vulnerability, but stand by you, are essential to your journey to redefine what is believed to be weakness. Strength comes from the heart. Don’t let your heart by trumped by your head, because in the long run, you’ll need a level-headed, honest perception from both.

Random thought: I find it disappointing when artwork, which was made with the expression of the heart and desires of the mind, is judged based on “academic standards” plagued with the opinion of the individual who judges, squashing the original meanings in which the work was made.

I don’t think any academic scale can truly determine the worth and value of one’s visual representation of their mind. Nobody sees your perception through your eyes and can interpret the story you wish to tell through similar appreciation. We seem to think that, even in academic standards, that our own boxes we prefer to sort works in based on our own belief of right and wrong visual representation are relevant when “judging” the work of others, but cringe at the thought of others using the same bias upon our own works. The double standards apply forcefully and consistently.

Who Are You, Anyway?

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I could classify myself in a number of ways, put myself in a box so you know exactly who and what I am, but I wouldn’t prefer to, simply because the box is too small. Ultimately, I am an amateur artist that seeks to discover the world on her own. I want to be able to drop everything one day, and just for some time, gather my own education through experience. They say that going to college and getting a degree is a necessary evil (and obviously a fun necessary evil at times), but I’m beginning to realize there’s more out there for me than burying my head in a textbook. Memorizing the scientific names of species covered in class is a daunting task for me (as my memory has no capability of doing this). So what if I could go out and interact with anthropologists that work in the field? What if I could get to “shadow” them for a day and actually physically see the work that goes into connecting the dots between species that have been yet to be discovered? THAT, my friend, would be learning. If I could study all of the subjects I encounter throughout my high school career in such a hands-on method, I think I would be passing, not only with flying colors, but with easy “A’s”. I guess you can just say that…I’m a little different. I prefer using my senses to learn, and I could only hope that one day, somewhere, I will get to do just that.

One thing that I have experienced through my life is the diversity of people you encounter on a daily basis. We are all very different in our ways of communication, thought, and action. I try to believe in the good in people, which slaps me in the face a lot if I look back upon my experiences prior to typing this, but I do also feel that some people DO naturally have great intentions for others. Those individuals are always the ones that are the rarest to find and the most impossible to forget, which makes them well worth the pursuance. I would say that I, myself, am a wisher and a hopeful and manage to do random acts of kindness each day out of genuine care.

I’m also always trying to find new ways to get out there through my creative talents because I feel as if my perspectives on the world and the experiences that I’ve gathered so far within my lifetime could potentially inspire other amateur artists like myself to have the confidence to explore their talents in the spotlight of the world. It can be intimidating to put yourself out there, but getting involved on the web has given me a new sense of invigorating freedom to express myself and to cultivate creativity in new and interesting ways. I’ve learned so much from other artists that I’ve interacted with online and I hope to one day feel as if I’ve made a similar difference amongst those that I have interacted with as well.

Hopefully this has given you a proper insight into what kind of individual/writer/artist I am, and I would love if you would subscribe and share with your friends. Sharing is caring! 🙂 Hopefully you find as much joy in my posts as I do when composing them!

Have a beautiful day, all you beautiful people of the blogosphere!

Mandy